{ "id":2292549550198, "title":"Calcium Magnesium Liquid by Valerie Saxion, Alternative Health Labs","handle":"cal002", "description":"\u003cdiv class=\"qsc-html-content\"\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eDescription\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003eThe USDA reports that adult women and adult men don't get enough calcium from their diets. The majority of teenagers are also lacking this vital nutrient. Calcium Magnesium is a delicious and refreshing drink that supplies calcium, magnesium, vitamin D, and boron in a unique 100% ionized form in just the right ratio for optimum benefits. We have changed our bottle size from 8oz to 16oz and it will now be in a plastic container instead of glass.\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003eCalcium is arguably the most important nutrient in your body.\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003eMore than 99% of your\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/www.algaecal.com\/algaecal-ingredients\/calcium\/\" data-saferedirecturl=\"https:\/\/www.google.com\/url?q=https:\/\/www.algaecal.com\/algaecal-ingredients\/calcium\/\u0026amp;source=gmail\u0026amp;ust=1551545905340000\u0026amp;usg=AFQjCNGBSsagcVrydkcEdIsAIo8YQljPZg\"\u003ecalcium\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eis stored in your bones and your teeth, which supports skeletal function and structure. The rest of the calcium in your body is used for other critical functions such as muscle contraction, blood vessel contraction and expansion, and sending messages through the nervous system.\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003eBut even though it’s one of the most critical minerals for your health, most people are still not getting enough. In fact,\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov\/pmc\/articles\/PMC2838624\/\" data-saferedirecturl=\"https:\/\/www.google.com\/url?q=https:\/\/www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov\/pmc\/articles\/PMC2838624\/\u0026amp;source=gmail\u0026amp;ust=1551545905340000\u0026amp;usg=AFQjCNHmqQwKsN-Hjhk7KgCn1YiEI0YrvQ\"\u003eone study suggests as much as 68% of the American population\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003eis calcium deficient.\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003eAdolescent girls and boys, women over 50, and men over 70 are at a particularly high\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/ods.od.nih.gov\/factsheets\/Calcium-Consumer\/#h5\" data-saferedirecturl=\"https:\/\/www.google.com\/url?q=https:\/\/ods.od.nih.gov\/factsheets\/Calcium-Consumer\/%23h5\u0026amp;source=gmail\u0026amp;ust=1551545905340000\u0026amp;usg=AFQjCNFz6ObkS_0SjDSKQZIXfInjyxQzKA\"\u003erisk of not meeting their daily calcium requirements\u003c\/a\u003e. Menopausal women, vegans, and anyone with a dairy intolerance are also more prone to calcium deficiency than the general population.\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003eWhat is Calcium Deficiency Disease?\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003eCalcium deficiency disease, known as hypocalcemia, is a global health problem. People around the world are simply not getting enough calcium from their diets. This is particularly problematic in developing nations where food sources may be scarce.\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003eWhen you have low calcium intake, you increase your risk of developing diseases like:\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003cul\u003e\n\u003cli\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e\n\u003cspan\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eOsteopenia\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e— Bone loss or bone thinning beyond the normal range is known as osteopenia. It’s a precursor to osteoporosis and is officially marked with a T-score between -1 and -2.49. T-scores are calculated as a part of\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/www.algaecal.com\/osteoporosis-treatment\/dexa-scan\/\" data-saferedirecturl=\"https:\/\/www.google.com\/url?q=https:\/\/www.algaecal.com\/osteoporosis-treatment\/dexa-scan\/\u0026amp;source=gmail\u0026amp;ust=1551545905340000\u0026amp;usg=AFQjCNFrDk2UmdErgx2Pj_PTT5ilUef5Nw\"\u003eDEXA scans\u003c\/a\u003e, which measure bone mineral density.\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e\n\u003cspan\u003e\u003c\/span\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eOsteoporosis\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e— Excessive bone density loss resulting in a T-score of -2.5 or lower is categorized as osteoporosis. Bones become weak and brittle and put you at an increased risk of fracture.\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003c\/ul\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003eIf your body doesn’t get enough calcium to keep its base functions running smoothly, it will leach calcium from your bones to make up for the shortfall.\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003eIf this goes on for long enough, your bone mineral density will deplete to the point of osteopenia or worse, osteoporosis.\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003eSince calcium is so critical throughout the body, low calcium symptoms can show up anywhere. And they can manifest in many different ways.\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003eSigns and Symptoms of Calcium Deficiency\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003eCalcium deficiency symptoms vary from mild to severe if left untreated. But even if you don’t have any obvious signs associated with low calcium, especially early on, metabolic changes and potential dysfunctions may have already begun.\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eMinor calcium deficiency symptoms can include:\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003cul\u003e\n\u003cli\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e\n\u003cspan\u003e\u003c\/span\u003eNumbness\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e\n\u003cspan\u003e\u003c\/span\u003eTingling Fingers\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e\n\u003cspan\u003e\u003c\/span\u003eMuscle cramps\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e\n\u003cspan\u003e\u003c\/span\u003eLethargy\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e\n\u003cspan\u003e\u003c\/span\u003ePoor appetite\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e\n\u003cspan\u003e\u003c\/span\u003eWeak or brittle fingernails\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e\n\u003cspan\u003e\u003c\/span\u003eDifficulty swallowing\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e\n\u003cspan\u003e\u003c\/span\u003eFainting\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003c\/ul\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eMore severe calcium deficiency symptoms can include:\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003cul\u003e\n\u003cli\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e\n\u003cspan\u003e\u003c\/span\u003eMental confusion, irritability, depression, and anxiety\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e\n\u003cspan\u003e\u003c\/span\u003eTooth decay\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e\n\u003cspan\u003e\u003c\/span\u003eInsufficient blood clotting\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e\n\u003cspan\u003e\u003c\/span\u003eBone fractures\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e\n\u003cspan\u003e\u003c\/span\u003eOsteopenia or osteoporosis\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e\n\u003cspan\u003e\u003c\/span\u003eGrowth and development delays in children\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e\n\u003cspan\u003e\u003c\/span\u003eHeart problems involving blood pressure and heart rhythms\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003c\/ul\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003eThe US Surgeon General warns that by 2020,\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov\/books\/NBK45515\/\" data-saferedirecturl=\"https:\/\/www.google.com\/url?q=https:\/\/www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov\/books\/NBK45515\/\u0026amp;source=gmail\u0026amp;ust=1551545905341000\u0026amp;usg=AFQjCNH-W_B984LJbSC5x49bar8eKIgM0w\"\u003e50% of people over the age of 50 will be at risk for osteoporotic fractures\u003c\/a\u003e. That’s right — half of the entire 50+ population is at risk of breaking a bone.\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003eAmerica is one of the top sufferers from osteoporosis in the world and the age to start getting concerned is getting younger and younger. Why you ask? Look at the following major governmental studies.\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003eFrom 1982–86 the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) conducted the “\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/www.fda.gov\/Food\/FoodScienceResearch\/TotalDietStudy\/default.htm\" data-saferedirecturl=\"https:\/\/www.google.com\/url?q=https:\/\/www.fda.gov\/Food\/FoodScienceResearch\/TotalDietStudy\/default.htm\u0026amp;source=gmail\u0026amp;ust=1551545905341000\u0026amp;usg=AFQjCNHdf8XdLnhbimws7CNLePmwWHxP4Q\"\u003eTotal Diet Study\u003c\/a\u003e.” The study found several age and gender groups deficient in calcium, magnesium, and several other minerals important to bone health.\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003eIn 1996, the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) completed its “\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/cfpub.epa.gov\/si\/si_public_record_Report.cfm?dirEntryID=132556\" data-saferedirecturl=\"https:\/\/www.google.com\/url?q=https:\/\/cfpub.epa.gov\/si\/si_public_record_Report.cfm?dirEntryID%3D132556\u0026amp;source=gmail\u0026amp;ust=1551545905341000\u0026amp;usg=AFQjCNGTrJ4YvO2I3IDcQbnAyOCc8Tc5HA\"\u003eContinuing Survey of Food Intakes of Individuals\u003c\/a\u003e,” which corroborated the FDA’s study. The USDA found both men and women of all ages were deficient in calcium. The most shocking statistic was for teen girls; 87% were not meeting their recommended daily intake of calcium.\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e\n\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/www.bones.nih.gov\/health-info\/bone\/bone-health\/juvenile\" data-saferedirecturl=\"https:\/\/www.google.com\/url?q=https:\/\/www.bones.nih.gov\/health-info\/bone\/bone-health\/juvenile\u0026amp;source=gmail\u0026amp;ust=1551545905341000\u0026amp;usg=AFQjCNFN967IPgu4zyxyH9HIOQHHk3y0mA\"\u003eThe National Institutes of Health compares\u003c\/a\u003e\u003cspan\u003e \u003c\/span\u003ebone growth in children like depositing money in the bank for when you’re older. During childhood and into early adulthood, more bone is deposited than withdrawn as the skeleton grows in density and size. So the more you build up in your formative years, the longer you’ll have a supply to draw from as you age.\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e \u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e \u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eCalcium is important for bone health. See how much calcium you need and how to get it.\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e\u003ca href=\"https:\/\/www.mayoclinic.org\/about-this-site\/welcome\" data-saferedirecturl=\"https:\/\/www.google.com\/url?q=https:\/\/www.mayoclinic.org\/about-this-site\/welcome\u0026amp;source=gmail\u0026amp;ust=1551545905341000\u0026amp;usg=AFQjCNFRp-UU-nhrAXlINOsLBSfKjq0vRQ\"\u003eBy Mayo Clinic Staff\u003c\/a\u003e\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003eCalcium is important for optimal bone health throughout your life. Although diet is the best way to get calcium, calcium supplements may be an option if your diet falls short.\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003eBefore you consider calcium supplements, be sure you understand how much calcium you need, the pros and cons of calcium supplements, and which type of supplement to choose.\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003eThe benefits of calcium\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003eYour body needs calcium to build and maintain strong bones. Your heart, muscles and nerves also need calcium to function properly.\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003eSome studies suggest that calcium, along with vitamin D, may have benefits beyond bone health: perhaps protecting against cancer, diabetes and high blood pressure. But evidence about such health benefits is not definitive.\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003eThe risks of too little calcium\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003eIf you don't get enough calcium, you could face health problems related to weak bones:\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003cul\u003e\n\u003cli style=\"font-weight: 400;\"\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e\n\u003cspan\u003e\u003c\/span\u003eChildren may not reach their full potential adult height.\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli style=\"font-weight: 400;\"\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e\n\u003cspan\u003e\u003c\/span\u003eAdults may have low bone mass, which is a risk factor for osteoporosis.\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003c\/ul\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003eMany Americans don't get enough calcium in their diets. Children and adolescents are at risk, but so are adults age 50 and older.\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003eCalcium requirements\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003eHow much calcium you need depends on your age and sex. Note that the upper limit in the chart represents the safe boundary — it's not how much you should aim to get. If you exceed the upper limit, you may increase your risk of health problems related to excessive calcium.\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003ctable width=\"468\" style=\"font-weight: 400;\"\u003e\n\u003cthead\u003e\n\u003ctr\u003e\n\u003ctd colspan=\"3\"\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eCalcium: Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) for adults\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/td\u003e\n\u003c\/tr\u003e\n\u003ctr\u003e\n\u003ctd\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eMen\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/td\u003e\n\u003ctd\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eDaily RDA\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/td\u003e\n\u003ctd width=\"0\"\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eDaily upper limit\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/td\u003e\n\u003c\/tr\u003e\n\u003c\/thead\u003e\n\u003ctbody\u003e\n\u003ctr\u003e\n\u003ctd\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e19-50 years\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/td\u003e\n\u003ctd\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e1,000 mg\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/td\u003e\n\u003ctd\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e2,500 mg\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/td\u003e\n\u003c\/tr\u003e\n\u003ctr\u003e\n\u003ctd\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e51-70 years\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/td\u003e\n\u003ctd\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e1,000 mg\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/td\u003e\n\u003ctd\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e2,000 mg\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/td\u003e\n\u003c\/tr\u003e\n\u003ctr\u003e\n\u003ctd\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e71 and older\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/td\u003e\n\u003ctd\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e1,200 mg\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/td\u003e\n\u003ctd width=\"0\"\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e2,000 mg\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/td\u003e\n\u003c\/tr\u003e\n\u003c\/tbody\u003e\n\u003cthead\u003e\n\u003ctr\u003e\n\u003ctd\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eWomen\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/td\u003e\n\u003ctd\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eDaily RDA\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/td\u003e\n\u003ctd width=\"0\"\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eDaily upper limit\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/td\u003e\n\u003c\/tr\u003e\n\u003c\/thead\u003e\n\u003ctbody\u003e\n\u003ctr\u003e\n\u003ctd\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e19-50 years\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/td\u003e\n\u003ctd\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e1,000 mg\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/td\u003e\n\u003ctd\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e2,500 mg\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/td\u003e\n\u003c\/tr\u003e\n\u003ctr\u003e\n\u003ctd\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e51 and older\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/td\u003e\n\u003ctd\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e1,200 mg\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/td\u003e\n\u003ctd\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e2,000 mg\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/td\u003e\n\u003c\/tr\u003e\n\u003c\/tbody\u003e\n\u003c\/table\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003eCalcium and diet\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003eYour body doesn't produce calcium, so you must get it through other sources. Calcium can be found in a variety of foods, including:\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003cul\u003e\n\u003cli style=\"font-weight: 400;\"\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e\n\u003cspan\u003e\u003c\/span\u003eDairy products, such as cheese, milk and yogurt\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli style=\"font-weight: 400;\"\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e\n\u003cspan\u003e\u003c\/span\u003eDark green leafy vegetables, such as broccoli and kale\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli style=\"font-weight: 400;\"\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e\n\u003cspan\u003e\u003c\/span\u003eFish with edible soft bones, such as sardines and canned salmon\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli style=\"font-weight: 400;\"\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e\n\u003cspan\u003e\u003c\/span\u003eCalcium-fortified foods and beverages, such as soy products, cereal and fruit juices, and milk substitutes\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003c\/ul\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003eTo absorb calcium, your body also needs vitamin D. A few foods naturally contain small amounts of vitamin D, such as canned salmon with bones and egg yolks. You can also get vitamin D from fortified foods and sun exposure. The RDA for vitamin D is 600 international units (15 micrograms) a day for most adults.\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003eWho should consider calcium supplements?\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003eEven if you eat a healthy, balanced diet, you may find it difficult to get enough calcium if you:\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003cul\u003e\n\u003cli style=\"font-weight: 400;\"\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e\n\u003cspan\u003e\u003c\/span\u003eFollow a vegan diet\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli style=\"font-weight: 400;\"\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e\n\u003cspan\u003e\u003c\/span\u003eHave lactose intolerance and limit dairy products\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli style=\"font-weight: 400;\"\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e\n\u003cspan\u003e\u003c\/span\u003eConsume large amounts of protein or sodium, which can cause your body to excrete more calcium\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli style=\"font-weight: 400;\"\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e\n\u003cspan\u003e\u003c\/span\u003eHave osteoporosis\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli style=\"font-weight: 400;\"\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e\n\u003cspan\u003e\u003c\/span\u003eAre receiving long-term treatment with corticosteroids\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli style=\"font-weight: 400;\"\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e\n\u003cspan\u003e\u003c\/span\u003eHave certain bowel or digestive diseases that decrease your ability to absorb calcium, such as inflammatory bowel disease or celiac disease\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003c\/ul\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003eIn these situations, calcium supplements may help you meet your calcium requirements. Talk to your doctor or dietitian to determine if calcium supplements are right for you.\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e \u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003eTypes of calcium supplements\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003eSeveral different kinds of calcium compounds are used in calcium supplements. Each compound contains varying amounts of the mineral calcium — referred to as elemental calcium. Common calcium supplements may be labeled as:\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003cul\u003e\n\u003cli style=\"font-weight: 400;\"\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e\n\u003cspan\u003e\u003c\/span\u003eCalcium carbonate (40 percent elemental calcium)\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli style=\"font-weight: 400;\"\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e\n\u003cspan\u003e\u003c\/span\u003eCalcium citrate (21 percent elemental calcium)\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli style=\"font-weight: 400;\"\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e\n\u003cspan\u003e\u003c\/span\u003eCalcium gluconate (9 percent elemental calcium)\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003cli style=\"font-weight: 400;\"\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e\n\u003cspan\u003e\u003c\/span\u003eCalcium lactate (13 percent elemental calcium)\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/li\u003e\n\u003c\/ul\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003eThe two main forms of calcium supplements are carbonate and citrate. Calcium carbonate is cheapest and therefore often a good first choice. Other forms of calcium in supplements include gluconate and lactate.\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003eIn addition, some calcium supplements are combined with vitamins and other minerals. For instance, some calcium supplements may also contain vitamin D or magnesium. Check the ingredient list to see which form of calcium your calcium supplement is and what other nutrients it may contain. This information is important if you have any health or dietary concerns.\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e \u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e\u003cstrong\u003eDisclaimers: *This statement has not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.\u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003ch5\u003e\u003cstrong\u003e \u003c\/strong\u003e\u003c\/h5\u003e\n\u003c\/div\u003e", "published_at":"2019-09-09T13:35:49", "created_at":"2018-10-30T13:24:39", "vendor":"CH\/NOW", "type":"", "tags":["1","alternative health labs","Bone Health","Foundational Nutrition","Joint Health","Muscle Health","Oral Health","Sleep","Supplements","Wellness"], "price":1300, "price_min":1300, "price_max":1300, "price_varies":false, "compare_at_price":3295, "compare_at_price_min":3295, "compare_at_price_max":3295, "compare_at_price_varies":false, "all_variant_ids":[20675308847222,22687035949174,22687035981942,22687036014710,22687036047478,22687036080246,22687036145782,22687036178550,22687036244086,22687036276854,22687036342390,22687036375158,22687036407926,22687036440694,22687036473462,22687036506230,22687036538998], "variants":[{ "id":20675308847222, "product_id":2292549550198, "product_handle":"cal002", "title":"Default Title", "option1":"Default Title", "option2":null, "option3":null, "sku":"CAL002", "requires_shipping":true, "taxable":true, "featured_image":null,"image_id":null, "available":true, "name":"Calcium Magnesium Liquid by Valerie Saxion, Alternative Health Labs - Default Title", "options":["Default Title"], "price":1300, "weight":227, "compare_at_price":3295, "inventory_quantity":8, "inventory_management":"shopify", "inventory_policy":"deny", "inventory_in_cart":0, "inventory_remaining":8, "incoming":false, "next_incoming_date":null, "taxable":true, "barcode":"0370"}], "available":true,"images":[],"featured_image":null, "options":["Title"], "url":"\/products\/cal002","hasCSP": true}

Calcium Magnesium Liquid by Valerie Saxion, Alternative Health Labs

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Description
The USDA reports that adult women and adult men don't get enough calcium from their diets. The majority of teenagers are also lacking this vital nutrient. Calcium Magnesium is a delicious and refreshing drink that supplies calcium, magnesium, vitamin D, and boron in a unique 100% ionized form in just the right ratio for optimum benefits. We have changed our bottle size from 8oz to 16oz and it will now be in a plastic container instead of glass.
Calcium is arguably the most important nutrient in your body.
More than 99% of your calcium is stored in your bones and your teeth, which supports skeletal function and structure. The rest of the calcium in your body is used for other critical functions such as muscle contraction, blood vessel contraction and expansion, and sending messages through the nervous system.
But even though it’s one of the most critical minerals for your health, most people are still not getting enough. In fact, one study suggests as much as 68% of the American population is calcium deficient.
Adolescent girls and boys, women over 50, and men over 70 are at a particularly high risk of not meeting their daily calcium requirements. Menopausal women, vegans, and anyone with a dairy intolerance are also more prone to calcium deficiency than the general population.
What is Calcium Deficiency Disease?
Calcium deficiency disease, known as hypocalcemia, is a global health problem. People around the world are simply not getting enough calcium from their diets. This is particularly problematic in developing nations where food sources may be scarce.
When you have low calcium intake, you increase your risk of developing diseases like:
  • Osteopenia — Bone loss or bone thinning beyond the normal range is known as osteopenia. It’s a precursor to osteoporosis and is officially marked with a T-score between -1 and -2.49. T-scores are calculated as a part of DEXA scans, which measure bone mineral density.
  • Osteoporosis — Excessive bone density loss resulting in a T-score of -2.5 or lower is categorized as osteoporosis. Bones become weak and brittle and put you at an increased risk of fracture.
If your body doesn’t get enough calcium to keep its base functions running smoothly, it will leach calcium from your bones to make up for the shortfall.
If this goes on for long enough, your bone mineral density will deplete to the point of osteopenia or worse, osteoporosis.
Since calcium is so critical throughout the body, low calcium symptoms can show up anywhere. And they can manifest in many different ways.
Signs and Symptoms of Calcium Deficiency
Calcium deficiency symptoms vary from mild to severe if left untreated. But even if you don’t have any obvious signs associated with low calcium, especially early on, metabolic changes and potential dysfunctions may have already begun.
Minor calcium deficiency symptoms can include:
  • Numbness
  • Tingling Fingers
  • Muscle cramps
  • Lethargy
  • Poor appetite
  • Weak or brittle fingernails
  • Difficulty swallowing
  • Fainting
More severe calcium deficiency symptoms can include:
  • Mental confusion, irritability, depression, and anxiety
  • Tooth decay
  • Insufficient blood clotting
  • Bone fractures
  • Osteopenia or osteoporosis
  • Growth and development delays in children
  • Heart problems involving blood pressure and heart rhythms
The US Surgeon General warns that by 2020, 50% of people over the age of 50 will be at risk for osteoporotic fractures. That’s right — half of the entire 50+ population is at risk of breaking a bone.
America is one of the top sufferers from osteoporosis in the world and the age to start getting concerned is getting younger and younger. Why you ask? Look at the following major governmental studies.
From 1982–86 the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) conducted the “Total Diet Study.” The study found several age and gender groups deficient in calcium, magnesium, and several other minerals important to bone health.
In 1996, the US Department of Agriculture (USDA) completed its “Continuing Survey of Food Intakes of Individuals,” which corroborated the FDA’s study. The USDA found both men and women of all ages were deficient in calcium. The most shocking statistic was for teen girls; 87% were not meeting their recommended daily intake of calcium.
The National Institutes of Health compares bone growth in children like depositing money in the bank for when you’re older. During childhood and into early adulthood, more bone is deposited than withdrawn as the skeleton grows in density and size. So the more you build up in your formative years, the longer you’ll have a supply to draw from as you age.
 
 
Calcium is important for bone health. See how much calcium you need and how to get it.
By Mayo Clinic Staff
Calcium is important for optimal bone health throughout your life. Although diet is the best way to get calcium, calcium supplements may be an option if your diet falls short.
Before you consider calcium supplements, be sure you understand how much calcium you need, the pros and cons of calcium supplements, and which type of supplement to choose.
The benefits of calcium
Your body needs calcium to build and maintain strong bones. Your heart, muscles and nerves also need calcium to function properly.
Some studies suggest that calcium, along with vitamin D, may have benefits beyond bone health: perhaps protecting against cancer, diabetes and high blood pressure. But evidence about such health benefits is not definitive.
The risks of too little calcium
If you don't get enough calcium, you could face health problems related to weak bones:
  • Children may not reach their full potential adult height.
  • Adults may have low bone mass, which is a risk factor for osteoporosis.
Many Americans don't get enough calcium in their diets. Children and adolescents are at risk, but so are adults age 50 and older.
Calcium requirements
How much calcium you need depends on your age and sex. Note that the upper limit in the chart represents the safe boundary — it's not how much you should aim to get. If you exceed the upper limit, you may increase your risk of health problems related to excessive calcium.
Calcium: Recommended Dietary Allowance (RDA) for adults
Men
Daily RDA
Daily upper limit
19-50 years
1,000 mg
2,500 mg
51-70 years
1,000 mg
2,000 mg
71 and older
1,200 mg
2,000 mg
Women
Daily RDA
Daily upper limit
19-50 years
1,000 mg
2,500 mg
51 and older
1,200 mg
2,000 mg
Calcium and diet
Your body doesn't produce calcium, so you must get it through other sources. Calcium can be found in a variety of foods, including:
  • Dairy products, such as cheese, milk and yogurt
  • Dark green leafy vegetables, such as broccoli and kale
  • Fish with edible soft bones, such as sardines and canned salmon
  • Calcium-fortified foods and beverages, such as soy products, cereal and fruit juices, and milk substitutes
To absorb calcium, your body also needs vitamin D. A few foods naturally contain small amounts of vitamin D, such as canned salmon with bones and egg yolks. You can also get vitamin D from fortified foods and sun exposure. The RDA for vitamin D is 600 international units (15 micrograms) a day for most adults.
Who should consider calcium supplements?
Even if you eat a healthy, balanced diet, you may find it difficult to get enough calcium if you:
  • Follow a vegan diet
  • Have lactose intolerance and limit dairy products
  • Consume large amounts of protein or sodium, which can cause your body to excrete more calcium
  • Have osteoporosis
  • Are receiving long-term treatment with corticosteroids
  • Have certain bowel or digestive diseases that decrease your ability to absorb calcium, such as inflammatory bowel disease or celiac disease
In these situations, calcium supplements may help you meet your calcium requirements. Talk to your doctor or dietitian to determine if calcium supplements are right for you.
 
Types of calcium supplements
Several different kinds of calcium compounds are used in calcium supplements. Each compound contains varying amounts of the mineral calcium — referred to as elemental calcium. Common calcium supplements may be labeled as:
  • Calcium carbonate (40 percent elemental calcium)
  • Calcium citrate (21 percent elemental calcium)
  • Calcium gluconate (9 percent elemental calcium)
  • Calcium lactate (13 percent elemental calcium)
The two main forms of calcium supplements are carbonate and citrate. Calcium carbonate is cheapest and therefore often a good first choice. Other forms of calcium in supplements include gluconate and lactate.
In addition, some calcium supplements are combined with vitamins and other minerals. For instance, some calcium supplements may also contain vitamin D or magnesium. Check the ingredient list to see which form of calcium your calcium supplement is and what other nutrients it may contain. This information is important if you have any health or dietary concerns.
 
Disclaimers: *This statement has not been evaluated by the FDA. This product is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.
 

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